Revived!

Our tomato plant looked like it was on the brink of death BUT, just about an hour after re-potting it, feeding it with water and fertilizers, and showering it with love and concern, it sprung back to life. It’s incredible how much difference a little treatment makes!

Speaking of treatment…I came up with a fake patient history for the role-play dysphagia treatment session I’m recording to show the speech pathology overseas qualifications assessors here that…I AM A FRIGGIN’ GENUINE SLP, DAMMIT! *Calms down*

Here is the patient history minus treatment plan:

Admitting Diagnosis for B.L.: S/P CVA (1 October 2008)

History: Pt. is a 35 year old male admitted to rehab secondary to acute CVA. P.M.H.also includes HTN, anxiety, and cehoraic dermatitis.

Upon initial evaluation during admittance to Rehab, client was found to present with the following:

Oral-Motor: Right sided droop. Decreased lingual ROM to the right, however, able to protrude and elevate. Decreased labial ROM, unable to retract on the right. Dentition intact. Voice – harsh vocal quality with low volume. Speech – slightly dysarthric, intelligibility is moderate also because of moderate speech intelligibility secondary to right sided droop.

Swallowing:
Puree – Patient seated upright high in bed and given puree X2, prompt swallow of bolus with no overt signs of aspiration, min. residue on linguam with swallow.
Thick liquid – via spoon/cup – Prompt swallow with no cough or vocal changes with swallow
Think liquid – via teaspoon – prompt swallow with immediate cough. Requires about 3-4 swallows after each take. Suspect aspiration. Chin tuck appears to help strengthen patient’s swallow and decrease wet vocal quality.
Solids – cracker – poor oral manipulation and anterior to posterior transit. Eventually had to remove bolus from patient’s mouth.
Patient also appears to have low safety awareness and tends to talk or look around when swallowing food.

Current diet: Puree (Puree food with honey-thick liquids)

Yeah…Kudos to the kind soul who has to act the part of the patient.

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